RETURN TO ISSUEPREVTreatment and Resour...Treatment and Resource RecoveryNEXT

Boosting the Catalytic Performance of CeO2 in Toluene Combustion via the Ce–Ce Homogeneous Interface

  • Ziang Su
    Ziang Su
    State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
    More by Ziang Su
  • Wenzhe Si*
    Wenzhe Si
    State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
    *Email: [email protected]
    More by Wenzhe Si
  • Hao Liu
    Hao Liu
    State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
    More by Hao Liu
  • Shangchao Xiong
    Shangchao Xiong
    State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
  • Xuefeng Chu
    Xuefeng Chu
    State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
    More by Xuefeng Chu
  • Wenhao Yang
    Wenhao Yang
    State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
    More by Wenhao Yang
  • Yue Peng
    Yue Peng
    State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
    More by Yue Peng
  • Jianjun Chen
    Jianjun Chen
    State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
    More by Jianjun Chen
  • Xingzhong Cao
    Xingzhong Cao
    Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
  • , and 
  • Junhua Li
    Junhua Li
    State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
    More by Junhua Li
Cite this: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2021, 55, 18, 12630–12639
Publication Date (Web):August 27, 2021
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.1c03999
Copyright © 2021 American Chemical Society
Article Views
856
Altmetric
-
Citations
-
LEARN ABOUT THESE METRICS
Read OnlinePDF (8 MB)
Supporting Info (1)»

Abstract

Catalytic combustion is an advanced technology to eliminate industrial volatile organic compounds such as toluene. In order to replace the expensive noble metal catalysts and avoid the aggregation phenomenon occurring in traditional heterogeneous interfaces, designing homogeneous interfaces can become an emerging methodology to enhance the catalytic combustion performance of metal oxide catalysts. A mesocrystalline CeO2 catalyst with abundant Ce–Ce homogeneous interfaces is synthesized via a self-flaming method which exhibits boosted catalytic performance for toluene combustion compared with traditional CeO2, leading to a ∼40 °C lower T90. The abundant Ce–Ce homogeneous interfaces formed by both highly ordered stacking and small grain size endow the CeO2 mesocrystal with superior redox property and oxygen storage capacity via forming various oxygen vacancies. Surface and bulk oxygen vacancies generate and activate crucial oxygen species, while interfacial oxygen vacancies further promote the reaction behavior of oxygen species (i.e., activation, regeneration, and migration), causing the splitting of redox property toward lower temperature. These properties facilitate aromatic ring decomposition, the important rate-determining step, thus contributing to toluene catalytic degradation to CO2. This work may shed insights into the catalytic effects of homogeneous interfaces in pollutant removal and provide a strategy of interfacial defect engineering for catalyst development.

Supporting Information

ARTICLE SECTIONS
Jump To

The Supporting Information is available free of charge at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.est.1c03999.

  • Experimental details, SEM images, supplementary HRTEM images, structural/stability/anti-poisoning test, CO catalytic combustion performance, XRD patterns, N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, pore size distributions, EXAFS spectra, raw Ce M4,5-edge EELS spectra, in situ UV–vis DRS spectra, representative DRIFTS spectra, evolution curves of DRIFTS bands, comparison with previously reported catalysts, and assignment of DRIFTS bands (PDF)

Terms & Conditions

Most electronic Supporting Information files are available without a subscription to ACS Web Editions. Such files may be downloaded by article for research use (if there is a public use license linked to the relevant article, that license may permit other uses). Permission may be obtained from ACS for other uses through requests via the RightsLink permission system: http://pubs.acs.org/page/copyright/permissions.html.

Cited By


This article has not yet been cited by other publications.