In Situ Generation of the Surface Oxygen Vacancies in a Copper–Ceria Catalyst for the Water–Gas Shift Reaction

  • Wen-Zhu Yu
    Wen-Zhu Yu
    Key Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Special Aggregated Materials, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, China
    More by Wen-Zhu Yu
  • Mei-Yao Wu
    Mei-Yao Wu
    Key Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Special Aggregated Materials, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, China
    More by Mei-Yao Wu
  • Wei-Wei Wang*
    Wei-Wei Wang
    Key Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Special Aggregated Materials, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, China
    *Email: [email protected]
    More by Wei-Wei Wang
  • , and 
  • Chun-Jiang Jia*
    Chun-Jiang Jia
    Key Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Special Aggregated Materials, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, China
    *Email: [email protected]
Cite this: Langmuir 2021, 37, 35, 10499–10509
Publication Date (Web):August 26, 2021
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.1c01428
Copyright © 2021 American Chemical Society
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Abstract

The dissociation of H2O is a crucial aspect for the water–gas shift reaction, which often occurs on the vacancies of a reducible oxide support. However, the vacancies sometimes run off, thus inhibiting H2O dissociation. After high-temperature treatment, the ceria supports were lacking vacancies because of sintering. Unexpectedly, the in situ generation of surface oxygen vacancies was observed, ensuring the efficient dissociation of H2O. Due to the surface reconstruction of ceria nanorods, the copper species sustained were highly dispersed on the sintered support, on which CO was adsorbed efficiently to react with hydroxyls from H2O dissociation. In contrast, no surface reconstruction occurred in ceria nanoparticles, leading to the sintering of copper species. The sintered copper species were averse to adsorb CO, so the copper–ceria nanoparticle catalyst had poor reactivity even when surface oxygen vacancies could be generated in situ.

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  • TEM and HRTEM images; catalytic performance; TPSR results; and in situ DRIFTS (PDF)

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